Charts

Chart: Offshore Profits Avoid IRS Reach

The chart indicates the quantity of offshore profits accumulated by large companies. The companies are grouped into technological companies and other. According to the table on the upper left, the company with the most offshore profits was General Electric, which gained about one hundred and ten billion dollars accumulated through deals outside of the US. General Electric was followed by Microsoft, Pfizer and Merck, respectively. The company that had made the least in offshore profits was Oracle with thirty three billion dollars.

Offshore Profits Avoid IRS Reach
Image via Bloomberg

The technological companies that had made the most through offshore holdings are Microsoft, Apple and IBM, respectively. These companies managed to generate between fifty and seventy billion dollars in profits in the year 2013. The graph depicting their earnings is located in the top right hand corner of the image. All companies experienced steady gains for a period of over three years.

In the bottom left hand corner, there is a diagram indicating the twenty two most successful companies in terms of overseas profits. General Electric, again was the leader with one hundred and ten billion in overseas profits and Myers-Squibb held the lowest profits (according to the table) with overseas profits of twenty-four billion dollars.

The bottom right table indicates that there were two hundred and eight five companies which also dealt in offshore ventures. Together, these companies have amassed an estimated nine hundred and sixty three billion dollars in overseas profits. This information was given courtesy of the Standard and Poor 500 index.

Chart: Poverty Rate Was Falling Until War on Poverty Began

This chart points out one of the interesting things about the poverty level in the US-it has not always decreased since the War on Poverty started.

Poverty Rate Was Falling Until War on Poverty Began

Part of the issue is that less of American’s yearly income is protected from income tax. Another issue is that wealthy people are paying less of a percentage on taxes of their income. But the primary reason may well be that wages have not kept up with inflation in most jobs.

Americans like to harken back to the days when they were younger, and prices seemed less, without figuring inflation into the mix. But along with prices inflation, there has not always been a sufficient growth in wages in many jobs. The minimum wage of $1.35 an hour in 1972 projects to be $7.66 in 2013-about where the minimum wage is today. Working people who earn the minimum wage today are not receiving any more real wages than they did receive in 1972.

Chart: U.S. Companies are Lending Billions of Offshore Dollars to the Government

Check out the chart below that displays an informative graph regarding money lended to the government, via offshore bank accounts.

Companies are lending offshore money to the government

In general, an offshore account is used to evade some type of government scrutiny. The irony being however that, Apple Inc., based on the graph, lends over to $40 billion to the government. The graph may also represent some entity that specialized in currency conversion for the sake of garnering a higher return on investment.

If Apple Inc. decided to invest U.S. dollars in an offshore acct, it could probably be doing so with the expectation that the U.S. Dollar can be converted to a particular currency which makes considerable gains against the Dollar. Likewise, when those gains begin to erode, it could be a valuable move to invest that money in a domestic source. In the aforementioned case: the U.S. government.

Chart: Most Successful Companies Ever Founded By People During Their Midlife Crisis

Youth is wasted on the young. Many successful men and women in their later years have said this. The only limitation to their success is the amount of life they have left. Many people hit milestones in there lives that are worthy of high praise: graduation, marriage, having children, etc. But these events are far from unique. If these are the only significant events in one’s life, he or she may find themselves in a crises. It might be mid-life in your 30’s and 40’s or even earlier. Rather than letting these moments of self-doubt and questioning bring you down, look at the chart below, courtesy of Fred Wilson, of the people who took those moments where they wondered if they were capable of doing more, and went on to do just that.

Chart: Most Successful Companies Ever Founded By People During Their Midlife Crisis

At age 35 Tim Westergren started Pandora, one of the most successful only radio services available. Michael Arrington started TechCrunch, and Jan Koum founded WhatsApp. The tech industry can seem like a young person’s game, meant for overachieving teens and 20 somethings. But that didn’t stop these men. Jimmy Wales founded Wikipedia and 35, and it is one of the most visited websites in the world. Being in your thirties doesn’t make you old. They still have plenty of time to be everything they want to be. What about 40? Is that too old to do anything meaningful? No! Companies like intel and Zip car were founded by people in their 40’s. And please don’t stop there. Two of the world’s tastiest things would be missing had John Pemberton and Harland Sanders not invented Coca-Cola and KFC in their 50’s and 60’s respectively.

Don’t let age stop you. There’s still time so long as you draw breath. There is always room for growth and potential.

2014 Is Gearing Up to be the Most Active IPO Market Since 2000

Based on the chart below it looks like 2014 is gearing up to be the most active IPO market since 2000. The image shows the year-to-date US IPO (Initial Public Offering) activity from the year 1999 to March 7 of the year 2014. The image is a graph, showing number of US IPOs on the y axis and years on the x axis.

2014 Is Gearing Up to be the Most Active IPO Market Since 2000

In 1999 the IPO market showed average activity with an amount of forty one IPOs being offered. This was countered in the next year, the year 2000, with an above-average surge of IPOs. In 2000 there were eighty three IPOs, much more than in any consecutive year. This made 2000 a very remarkable year.

For the next three years, IPO activity diminished with twelve, ten and four IPOs offered in 2001, 2002 and 2003, respectively. IPO activity then realized a resurgence to near average levels between 2004 and 207. In 2006 there were 35 IPOs, which was the most activity experienced during any one year in that period.

In 2008 and 2009 IPO market activity once again entered a slump, as neither year produced more than ten IPOs.

Growth was slow in 2010 with only fourteen IPOs offered, an d eventually IPO activity averaged in the early to mid twenties for the next three years. In 2014, IPO market activity approached the high levels once seen in 1999, when forty IPOs were offered.