HSA: Guess Not Yet Time

Would the question rather be should you? Or would you? Now before we indulge in some plain talking, let us first know what HSA is all about.

What is HSA?

HSA or Health Savings Account, tax benefited medical savings account, which is available to taxpayers who are enrolled in an HDHP or High-deductible Health Plan. The funds invested in such an account will not attract Federal taxes at the time of deposit.

And now come back to the question, why shouldn’t we have an HSA?

Now let me be clear at the onset, that HSA does offer some great benefits and is not all bad. In fact, it should be a plan for the future for every young investor and savings aficionado. However, it really is not for everybody. Let us see the reasons:

  1. HSA needs time to have your funds build up. HSA is basically the combination of employees as well as the employer contributing towards that account, every payday. Now, given that kind of a rate and depending on the expense getting pulled out, it does take a fair amount of time for money to build up.
  2. Suddenly the drug prices begin to pinch. A $20 prescription drug can suddenly turn into a $120 behemoth. Now we know there is a reason for it but it usually is very confusing to understand the dynamics behind it all.
  3. The HDHP is named for a reason. High Deductible in an HSA is high. Period. Compared to most traditional health plans, the deductible here is absolutely in the north. The IRS has also asked for HSA plans to have a minimum family deductible of $2400. On the higher, this figure could touch $6500 for a maximum out of pocket payment of $12100. One look at the figure and you can understand that this entails a lot of cash in one go.
  4. One of the greatest reasons why HSA is not for everyone is primarily because of the confusion it creates. Now, as a rule, you can use your HSA card to pay for any 213(d) expense. There is a list of expenses which fall under the 213(d) expenses as per the schedule present in the IRS Code Section 213(d) Eligible Medical Expenses. The question is how many of us would actually know it. None carry a list and would probably ever do.
  5. As I had mentioned earlier, HSA has its fair share of advantages, but because of the lack of education, it becomes very difficult for most organizations to drive it among its employees. HAS does require a bit of self-research but when fully understood it does offer great benefits. Till such time, it would be an advice to look out for more traditional and simpler medical plans.